Browsing articles tagged with " Mark Driscoll"
Apr 3, 2012
neil

Mark Driscoll’s top 10 tips for preaching this Easter

Mark Driscoll’s 10 tips on getting your message across this Easter Sunday.

 

 

 

Jan 13, 2012
neil

Why I’m still listening to Mark Driscoll even if other British Evangelicals are not

What would you like to ask the man whos church baptised 1392 people in 2011 in one of the most secular, least churched, cities of the United States of America?

I had the privilege of gathering a small number of people, including a Bishop, to have dinner with Pastor Mark in Birmingham last May. He gave us two hours of his time to listen to the challenges that face our city in how we get the gospel out to a lost generation. Not one of us had any connect with Acts29. He neither asked for, nor took, any of our money. We did a lot of listening and learning.

A number of people including some good friends of mine argue Driscoll goes too far. I don’t doubt it for a moment but he’s right to say that he does it in a church culture where hardly anybody goes far enough.

I live on a council estate in Birmingham and the one thing I know for sure is that men where I live are not going to church and there is no church I could think of many of them would want to go to including my own. Millions of people are going to hell and the church is not ready or able to do something. I’ll take all the help I can get from a guy who is helping me see how to get working class, blue-collar workers to hear about Jesus. Driscoll preaches expository sermons, over an hour in length, promises no-one wealth or health, talks honestly and openly about the reality of heaven and hell, calls upon people to live radically holy, self-denying lives and above all else talks about Jesus, Jesus, Jesus AND people are converted. It’s time to listen.

Whatever we think Driscoll has got wrong it pales into comparison with what he’s got right and for that I praise God. If I had to choose, I would rather he continued to go too far than not far enough provided that his basic conclusions are sound. The trouble for British evangelicalism, as it seems to me, is that we don’t like it.

The decision of Christianity Magazine to pre-lease a web article with highly edited and potentially misleading quotations from a Driscoll interview on his views on the British church can hardly be considered responsible publishing, and Mark Driscoll has  a point when he questions the motives of the magazine in choosing to do so. I for one would not appreciate such a pre-release.

Whatever Mark Driscoll may have got wrong he’s got a whole lot more right. So come on British evangelicals – let’s take the medicine – and learn.

If you want to know Pastor Mark’s views on the British church at greater length in his own words then this might be a place to start A Word for all seasons.

 

Jan 3, 2012
neil

Tim Keller or Mark Driscoll – whose book on marriage should you buy?

Typical, you wait years for a book on marriage and then two come out within a couple of months of each other. I’m talking about The meaning of marriage by Tim and Kathy Keller and Real Marriage by Mark and Grace Driscoll.

Given that most of us will probably choose one or the other (at best) how do you go about deciding between the two.

Tim Challies considers one to be ‘my new favorite book on marriage and the best of all the books I read in 2011‘ but when assessing the other concludes ‘Would I want to read it with my wife or would I encourage her to read it on her own? Would I recommend it to the people in my church? In both cases the answer is no.’

Read his reviews to find out why and if you’ve the time and the money to read both make up your own mind!

 

Dec 19, 2011
neil

Top tips for Dads this Christmas from Mark Driscoll



Dricoll’s tips I want to remember 2,4,6,11

Driscoll’s tips I need to remember 3,9,10,15

 

Nov 23, 2011
neil

Why more men should help out at the church Sunday School

I’m proud of the fact that a number of the key leaders in our church’s children’s work are men. Our head of children’s work is a man and the head of our new Friday kids club is a man. Our 3-5 year olds work is also headed up by a man. I say all this at a time when the average age of children in the church is 5.

Please don’t misunderstand me, we have some very able female leaders in the team. I guess it’s just that churches expect that  to be the case. But I’m proud of the fact that we are developing a culture in which men and women want to lead this work together.

Here’s a short post by Mark Driscoll encouraging men into this vital ministry.

 

 

Sep 13, 2011
neil

Mark Driscoll has a new website

May 21, 2011
neil

When does porn disqualify me from ministry?

Tomorrow evening I preach 1 Timothy 3 including v.2 ‘the overseer must be above reproach, the husband of but one wife.’

As Ryken notes in his commentary this phrase is not limited to a discussion on polygamy and how many wives you can have (!) but that ‘elders must be morally accountable for their sexuality

So it was useful to stumble across this from Mark Driscoll in the week leading up to my sermon.

May 19, 2011
neil

Mark Driscoll in conversation on city-wide church planting partnerships

May 14, 2011
neil

Driscoll, Timmis, Powell/Bell – church planting audio now on line

Last Thursday and Friday 400 people gathered in Birmingham, UK, for a  church planting bootcamp for all seasons hosted by Acts29 Western Europe and 2020birmingham.

Speakers included Mark Driscoll, Steve Timmis, Neil Powell and Jonathan Bell.

The audio is now available to download and enjoy.

May 9, 2011
neil

8 lessons in church planting from the forallseasons conference

On Thursday and Friday of last week ‘for all seasons’ church planting conference took place in Birmingham co-hosted by Acts29 Western Europe and 2020birmingham. Audio and video from the conference will be available soon. But here are eight take homes for me from the two days.

1. God is doing amazing things in our nation(s). To have 400 people all seriously thinking about church planting (and a further 220 at a London based conference on planting the day before) highlights a transformation in the church scene in the UK and Western Europe.

2. The atmosphere at the conference was just fantastic.  A real unity was evident and the whole time was remarkably free of tribalism and suspicions of others. There was just a huge desire, borne out of a spirit-filled generosity, to bless others. The attitude was one of ‘how can I help you? How can I bless you?’ By passing on freely anything and everything we really wanted to help others be better planters!  At a dinner with Mark Driscoll on the Thursday evening we had representatives of New Frontiers, FIEC, the Anglican Diocese and Elim Pentecostal all sitting down together thinking how we might work together to get the gospel to the city of Birmingham!

3. Our failure to attempt great things for God is often borne out of fear of men. That means we need to recognise that ‘it is a sin to take too much of a risk in planting but it is as much of a sin not to take a risk out of fear.’ Mark Driscoll

4. On a similar theme it’s not enough for a small church to think we can’t do anything when it comes to church planting. True a small church may not be able to plant itself but it can contribute to a bigger vision (prayer, finances, wisdom and knowledge of a community or city).

A church planting conference should not just be full of church planters any more than a missions conference should be full of people about to head off overseas. As Rick Warren has said elsewhere ‘it is not a sin to be a small church but it is a sin to be a small church with a small vision’.

5. It really does matter what motivates us in church planting. To have a healthy church plant we need a healthy church planter and the gospel at the heart of our motivates is essential.

Steve Timmis challenged us with the question ‘Are we looking to church planting for our justification? Looking to church planting for our place in the world?’ And when that is a danger the antidote to that is remembering ‘church planter, our identity is ‘in Christ’’. And that has huge implications because succeed or fail (humanly speaking) I am secure in who I am.  ‘My church plant can break up into a 100 different pieces but nothing can change the fact that I am ‘in Christ’ Steve Timmis.

6. ‘Every year you plant your church again’. Mark Driscoll reminded us that the way to grow your church plant and be effective in leadership is never to stop being a church planter but to look to the same mindset to keep growing.

7. The 2020birmingham initiative reminded us all that it takes a big vision to impact a big city. If our vision is to plant a church, even a large church, it has to give way to God’s vision which is nothing less than his global fame. If our vision is to reach our cities for Christ rather than plant a church that requires a paradigm shift in our thinking. In the past 10 to 15 years we have undergone one important shift from accidental planting to intentional planting. Now we need the second shift from intentional planting to intentional partnerships in church planting. Working together to fulfil a vision that no one church is equipped to make on its own.

8. Finally, church planting must, if it is to be true to the gospel, never be about empire building. ‘How do I live out my identity? By being a lover of God and a lover of others. Whoever it is about it is never about me.’ Steve Timmis

Pages:12»
Facebook Twitter RSS Feed