Browsing articles tagged with " church"
Oct 4, 2013
neil

Can We Finally Start Talking About The Global Persecution Of Christians? Two chilling articles

Two recent articles highlighting both the desperate plight facing Christians in many parts of the world and also the shocking silence of the world’s leaders on the issues.

John Allen in the Spectator writes:

According to the Pew Forum, between 2006 and 2010 Christians faced some form of discrimination, either de jure or de facto, in a staggering total of 139 nations, which is almost three-quarters of all the countries on earth. According to the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Massachusetts, an average of 100,000 Christians have been killed in what the centre calls a ‘situation of witness’ each year for the past decade. That works out to 11 Christians killed somewhere in the world every hour, seven days a week and 365 days a year, for reasons related to their faith.

In effect, the world is witnessing the rise of an entire new generation of Christian martyrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And this article by Mollie Hemingway in the Federalist (not a site known to me before now) in which she quotes from a book by Paul Marshall, Lela Gilbert and Nina Shea entitled Persecuted the Global Assault on Christians

Christians are the single most widely persecuted religious group in the world today. This is confirmed in studies by sources as diverse as the Vatican, Open Doors, the Pew Research Center, Commentary, Newsweek and the Economist. According to one estimate, by the Catholic Bishops’ Conferences of the European Community, 75 percent of acts of religious intolerance are directed against Christians.”

(HT: Yvonne Nickerson & Helen Ogbourn)

Aug 22, 2013
neil

GK Chesterton on how we travel the world to avoid life not discover it

If we love to read some authors because they confirm our opinions we learn to appreciate others because they change them.  A good writer might just change our minds. GK Chesterton (1874-1936) was such a man.  A brilliant mind and a prolific writer I discovered that he wrote around 80 books, several hundred poems, some 200 short stories, 4000 essays, and several plays. He was a literary and social critic, historian, playwright, novelist, Catholic theologian and apologist, debater, and mystery writer.

Over the summer I’ve been reading his book Heretics . One of the reasons he was so good at getting  around my defences was through his appeal to paradox. He works to show you how they very thing you seek is not found in the way you seek it. In fact, he warns, seek it in the wrong place and you lose it altogether.

The following extracts from his essay On Certain Modern Writers and the Institution of the Family is an example of just how powerfully paradox works as a literary device. Subverting our assumptions, we find our views challenged and our minds changed. A whole new way of looking at things not only opens up but begins to become attractive to us.

The argument is simply this: if we really want to live life how do we do it? Chesterton asks where do we really experience life; is it in moving to the big city? Is it in travelling the world? Is life found in seeking after all kinds of new opportunities and experiences? Or might we find that the truth is found in deliberately pursuing just the opposite? Is life actually found in learning to love those who live right alongside us? Might we see more of the world by staying just where we are?

In a culture where we are desperately concerned not to miss out Chesterton argues we miss out when we fail to invest our live in a meaningful  community.

1. Where life is really lived

The man who lives in a small community lives in a much larger world. He knows much more of the fierce varieties and uncompromising divergences of men. The reason is obvious. In a large community we can choose our companions. In a small community our companions are chosen for us.

2. Why large societies are about life-avoidance

A big society exists in order to form cliques. A big society is a society for the promotion of narrowness. It is a machinery for the purpose of guarding the solitary and sensitive individual from all experience of the bitter and bracing human compromises. It is, in the most literal sense of the words, a society for the prevention of Christian knowledge.

3. Life is discovered not in seeing places but in loving people

If we were tomorrow morning snowed up in the street in which we live, we should step suddenly into a much larger and much wilder world than we have ever known. And it is the whole effort of the typically modern person to escape from the street in which he lives. First he invents modern hygiene and goes to Margate. Then he invents modern culture and goes to Florence. Then he invents modern imperialism and goes to Timbuctoo. He goes to the fantastic borders of the earth. He pretends to shoot tigers. He almost rides on a camel. And in all this he is still essentially fleeing from the street in which he was born; and of this flight he is always ready with his own explanation. He says he is fleeing from his street because it is dull; he is lying. He is really fleeing from his street because it is a great deal too exciting. It is exciting because it is exacting; it is exacting because it is alive. He can visit Venice because to him the Venetians are only Venetians; the people in his own street are men. He can stare at the Chinese because for him the Chinese are a passive thing to be stared at; if he stares at the old lady in the next garden, she becomes active. He is forced to flee, in short, from the too stimulating society of his equals — of free men, perverse, personal, deliberately different from himself. The street in Brixton is too glowing and overpowering. He has to soothe and quiet himself among tigers and vultures, camels and crocodiles.

4. What God is trying to teach us through community

We make our friends; we make our enemies; but God makes our next-door neighbour. . . we have to love our neighbour because he is there — a much more alarming reason for a much more serious operation. He is the sample of humanity which is actually given us. Precisely because he may be anybody he is everybody. He is a symbol because he is an accident.

All of Chesterton’s arguments, powerfully and persuasively made I’m sure you’ll agree, serve to challenge our view of church. For example, is church a place to visit or a community to learn from? Do we like our large churches because that way we can avoid people? We can decide who to love and when we don’t want to love others, especially those who differ from us, we can easily ignore them? Is a large church a decision not to grow-up through sharing in the joys and sorrows of our Christian brother and sister?

On holiday on Sunday in a small family church when one couple shared the news that the wife had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer Chesterton’s observations were confirmed in an instant. The news would impact every member of that church family who by virtue of their community life shared  life together, week in and week out.

Mar 12, 2013
neil

All men watch porn

A sad and sobering report in the Telegraph of a University of Montreal study in which they could not find a male student who had not consumed pornography. 

The study found that the average age at which boys were introduced to porn was 10 years old.It also found that single men viewed pornography 3 times a week for an average of 40 minutes each time and men in relationships 1.7 times a week for 20 minutes each time.

What does all this mean for Christians? Who’s keeping watch in your church? Here are 12 questions that spring to mind that need the attention of any leadership team.

1. Should we work from the assumption that our young men (and probably our older men too) are viewing pornography?

2. How and when should be raising the issue with our children? At what age? In what way?

3.  How and in what context should we be talking about these issues with the men of our church? When did we last talk to the men about this?

4. What do we need to say to wives and girlfriends? Do they understand the nature of the struggle?

5. How do we protect marriages from ‘virtual-adultery’? Are we helping husbands and wives to talk wisely and appropriately about this issue?

6. What are the statistics for women? Is this a  growing issue for both sexes?

7. What accountability structures do church leaders have in place for their own behaviour? Who is asking them whether they are viewing pornography? How can they model godliness in this area of life?

8. What support and accountability do we offer for those willing to acknowledge that this is an issue for them? What church discipline is appropriate too?

9.  What are the lies that capture our hearts and make pornography a battle for every man? Do we understand its power?

10. Do we know how to fight this battle through the gospel rather than by mere will-power of self-control?

11. What do we want to say to non-Christians who might be part of the wider church community?

12. How do we help apply the gospel to those who have a ‘past’ in this area even if it is no longer a dangerous issue? 

Mar 31, 2012
neil

Why people in their 20’s are struggling with church

Why people in their 20’s are struggling with church

At our church we have started a ministry to 20somethings. Recognising that the transition out of teenage years and student life into the world of work and grown-up church brings great challenges for many.

Here are the 10 most likely reasons to struggle as compiled by Rob & Hosanna who head up this new ministry.

We’ve grouped them into four categories

Anonymous & unsupported:

  1. You used to be known by everyone in your parents’ church; now it seems like no one knows you.
  2. You were previously in a church where you felt you belonged and were valued. Arriving at your new church it might have been welcoming and friendly but you rarely see the same people Sunday by Sunday.
  3. You used to belong to a smaller church; now you feel lost in a bigger church and don’t know what to do about it apart from find a smaller church.

Under-used & unappreciated:

  1. You had a lot of leadership responsibility as a student; now it feels like you are bottom of the pile again.
  2. You were used to leading bible studies every week; now no one seems to want you to lead any.
  3. You did a year working for a church and felt invested-in and trained; now you are a ‘normal’ member you feel stagnant and under-used.

Frustrated by how other people are so very different to you:

  1. When in a student bible-study group, everyone seemed on the same wavelength and enthusiastic; now those around you seem more tired and perhaps a little apathetic.
  2. You felt challenged, encouraged and you were continually gaining new knowledge and skills; now you feel that those around you are old-fashioned and you find it difficult to engage in bible-study.
  3. You looked forward to getting to know non-students; yet you now find that you don’t really know anyone very well and it is taking ages to get to know people at a different age and stage to you.

Lacking in time and energy:

  1. You used to have plenty of time to go to lots of meetings/events; now work/life is so busy you can’t manage to get to things/feel pressured to go/guilty if you don’t/too tired to engage if you do/resentful and longing for things to finish so you can get to bed

 

Mar 21, 2012
neil

Should we use smartphones in church?

John Dyer investigates!

May 20, 2011
neil

Should women teach in the church

Should women teach in the church?

Let a woman learn quietly with all submissiveness.  I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet. – 1 Timothy 2:11-12 (ESV)

Let’s just get straight to the point. Some of you are pretty offended by these words. They sound outrageous to modern ears. For many they simply reveal the most shameful gender discrimination from someone who can only be described as a misogynist.

But as with any Bible verse it has a context and it certainly won’t help us if we take this verse out of context of the bigger story of the Bible.

We know that these verses, to be consistent with what we read elsewhere, cannot be declaring women to be second-class citizens or in any way less than men.

We know that God created men and women in his image. In Genesis chapter 1 we read;

So God created man in his own image,
in the image of God he created him;
male and female he created them.

So whatever Paul is saying in the controversial verses of 1 Timothy, Genesis 1 along with some of Paul’s own words eg 1 Cor. 11:11, Gal.3:28 demonstrate that there is something much more sophisticated than a slur on women or a desire to suppress women and relegate their role and place in the church and society.

Women are to learn

It’s remarkably easy for us to gloss over the fact that Paul says in v.11 that women are to learn at all. In many cultures, then and now, women are given little if any opportunity to learn.

Commentators point out that in orthodox Judaism of Paul’s day there was little or no place for women learning and some strands of Islam, by their refusal to offer education to girls alongside boys, demonstrate a same degradation of women even to this day.

Women are to learn but Paul does want them to lean but in quietness. The context is most likely that  of a Christian meeting where the congregation is learning together. The word quietness in this context means ‘listening quietly with deference and attentiveness to the one teaching..ie not speaking out of turn and thereby interrupting the lesson.’ It is the language of respect.

We don’t know exactly what was going on in Ephesus, the church context into which Paul is writing.  Was it simply that the women were distracted, or had a divided attention, or maybe they didn’t have a particularly teachable spirit? We don’t know. But it suggests a situation in which the teaching of the word was up against distraction or interruption.

There is maybe something to be learned from the story of Mary and Martha (Luke 10:38-42) in which Martha is distracted from listening to Jesus whilst Mary demonstrates the very thing that is pleasing to him, adopting the position of a disciple by humbly listening to his word.

But what about the ‘s’ word!

Whatever else Paul may be saying some of us we can’t get beyond the ‘s’ word submission.

Women according to v.12 are not to teach or have authority over men.

To call upon women to submit seems exploitative and dangerous and contrary to good sense. Does it not rob women of their dignity and value?

Well, firstly, this is not a call for all women to submit to all men. This is rather a call for the women of this church to join the majority of the men in submitting to the leadership of the church.

But even then should women submit to anybody?

The Bible’s answer is that submission is a good thing for at least two reasons.

1) All Christians submit. And every Christian by virtue of their submission to God submits to others as an expression of their commitment to God. A Christian is by definition then someone who submits. We all submit to God, we submit to the ruling authorities, whilst we are children we submit to our parents, we are to submit to our boss at work, and so on.

For different people in different stages of life and in different situations we submit in different ways.

God’s ordering in the church and the family includes the principle of submission. The relationship between a husband and a wife in Ephesians 5 and the relationship between the women of the church and male leadership (see also 1 Cor. 14:33-34) is one in which God calls for an ordering of relationships.

2) Jesus submitted. Submission is a good thing only if you think you might want to be like Jesus. For as one commentator as put it ‘he knew the beauty of submission’.

God the Father and God the Son fully God are both fully God. They are fully equal in status and yet throughout the Bible we find the Son submitting to the Father and never the Father to the Son. So even in the God-head we find the principle of order amongst equals.

We shouldn’t therefore regard it as an insult to submit to our equal if we find Jesus willing to do the very same.

Prince William and Prince Harry

In 1 Timothy 3 Paul says that male leadership is rooted in creation ‘for Adam was formed first, then Eve.’ It is not that Adam is better than Eve but perhaps jsut as the Son comes from teh Father so the woman came from teh man and they are to live out at church and in the family that ordering of relationship.

We know that Prince William will one day be King and not Prince Harry. Is it because William is better? More intelligent? More deserving? No. Just that he came first. And so it is within the church.

So should women ever teach?

Again the broader context of the Bible clearly suggests that women can and will teach as they play a full role in church life.

In Titus 2:3-5 we find that they are to teach younger women and children.

We know from Acts 2:17-18 ‘your sons and daughters will prophesy’ and 1 Cor. 11:4-5 that women prayed in the gathered church and prophesied.

We know that women were deacons in the local church from Romans 16v1.

We also find in the book of Acts that Priscilla (a woman) and Aquilla (her husband) taught Apollos together, Acts 18:26.

There were many prominent women in Jesus’ own ministry. They were his disciples and we’re told that ‘these women were helping to support them out of their own means.’

In God’s plan the first to witness the resurrection and to meet the risen Lord Jesus were women.

Peter and the other apostles took their wives with them in ministry, 1 Cor. 9:5.

But there is no evidence at all for women in either the Old Testament or the New Testament holding a teaching office.

Jesus chose to appoint men and only men to the role of Apostles and nowhere do we find Paul or the other apostles appointing women to overall leadership in the local church.

Women are not to lead the church through the preaching of God’s word and nor are most of the men.

Paul isn’t saying that all men are to teach all women, nor that all women are to submit to all men.

No all women and the vast majority of men are to submit to the (male) eldership of the church.

The kind of teaching that Paul limits to a few men here is a teaching with authority

Philip Graham Ryken writes ‘Women and men may teach on a wide variety of biblical historical, and practical subjects.’

Women can write great blogs and books. They can write Bible commentaries and teach at Bible Colleges.

But where teaching is an expression of leadership ie where it is an indicator of authority it is there that God’s order within the church is to be recognised.

How does that work out at my own church

Women exercise a teaching role that stops short of a preaching with authority role.

So women regularly teach on a variety of issues eg parenting, marriage enrichment and so on.

They teach practical seminars, lead services, administer the Lord’s supper.

Conclusion

The Bible does not sit comfortably in any community in the world. At some point sooner or later the bible will critique the culture in which we live. In our western world the role of women is one of those clash of culture points. It is at times like this that we need to continue to humbly listen to scripture and be ready to face the challenge of the world as we witness to the God of the Bible.

May the very situations in which we submit for the sake of God to his word and his will point us all to the Christ who chose to submit even to death and death on a cross.

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