Browsing articles in "city"
Jan 28, 2015
neil

3 reasons to be at this conference

What do we need to grasp to be effective ministers of the gospel in a city?

1. Cities are the future

Today for the first time in human history over half of the world’s population live in cities. The UN estimate in World Population Prospects that by 2050 the world will be 68.7 percent urban.

Stephen Um & Justin Buzzard in their book Why Cities Matter write ‘never before have cities been as populated, powerful, and important as they are today. . .cities shape the world because what happens in the cities spreads.’

Copyright Helen Ogbourn

2. Cities never stay the same

Um & Buzzard point out a second feature of cities – the pace of change.  ‘Nothing ever stays the same in cities. There is constant movement.’ A city like Birmingham has changed beyond recognition in the 40 years I have lived here. It looks different, feels different and thinks differently. It takes time, insight and skill to answer the question ‘what do I need to know to most effectively love and communicate Christ to my city both now and for the next 20 years?’

3. Ministry in cities is complex

One final observation worth highlighting from Um & Buzzard, ‘cities are populated with people of various cultures, different worldviews, and different vocations. Cities force individuals to refine their cultural assumptions, religious beliefs, and sense of calling.’

That raises important questions: what is the future of my particular city? What kinds of opportunities does urbanisation present for the gospel? What does it mean for our church to be a church for the city?

Meeting the challenge

If cities are growing in size, power and influence and if cities are always in a flux of change and if cities are ever-more diverse in assumptions and beliefs then the church must come together to face the challenge and to find answers to the issues we face.

2020birmingham will be holding its 2015 annual conference entitled City of the Future on the 10th March here in Birmingham.  And the issues in this post form the heart of our conference agenda. Which ever city you represent why not come along and learn together how better to reach and serve our city now and into the future.

Jan 15, 2015
neil

City of the future

 

Every church can and must become a church for its particular city suggests Tim Keller.  

Which means that if we are to reach our city with the gospel of Christ we will need to establish churches  and ministries that are committed to the city and that can also effectively engage the people of the city.  The future of the city is therefore our theme because it has never been more important to discern all that is required to contextualise the never-changing  gospel in an ever-changing city.

At this year’s 2020birmingham conference we will ask:

  • What are the challenges and opportunities?
  • What does the church need to do and be?
  • What does it mean to serve the good of the city?
  • What might it look like to not just live in the city but to love it now and in the future?

This year’s 2020 conference will equip you and your church to better understand what lies ahead so that, with humble confidence, we can do effective ministry now and in the coming years. We want to cultivate ministries that both honour God and bless the lives of those who live in our great city.

We are delighted that the Rt. Revd. David Urquhart, Bishop of Birmingham will be one of our speakers.

From one man he made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from any one of us.’ Acts 17:26-27

The conference will be held at Birmingham Christian Centre on Tuesday 10th March from 10am to 4.30pm. For further information and to book a place visit 2020future.

2020birmingham is a catalyst for church-planting in our city seeking to assist in the planting of 20 new churches in our city between 2010 and 2020. For a brief introduction to the story so far visit Momentum. We are also part of City to City Europe.

 

Dec 3, 2014
neil

When people leave London why do more move to Birmingham than anywhere else?

The Office of National Statistics has published a report highlighting the fact that  more people are choosing to leave London in their 30’s than ever before.

The Telegraph reports ‘58,220 people aged from 30 to 39 left the capital between June 2012 and June 2013; a record number, and a ten per cent increase on 2010.’

So where are these people heading? More are heading to Birmingham than anywhere else. The Birmingham Post  comments ‘5,480 thirtysomethings left London for Birmingham last year, making it a more popular choice than any other UK city.’

In other words almost 1 in 10 people who leave London, head for Birmingham.

Tom Cullen is one such example why not find out why through his subscription e-mail I choose Birmingham

Nov 20, 2014
neil

Taking it to the next level – what is a third level gospel partnership?

I was invited to speak at the recent FIEC leaders conference on  the topic of Leading a partnering church and outlined the way in which churches are coming together in our city to collaborate in church-planting initiatives – under the 2020birmingham banner.

Here is the video of the presentation

Jun 12, 2014
neil

A life of its own – how a city movement multiplies churches

At our 2020birmingham conference last week I outlined 14 different reasons why UK cities would benefit from city-wide church planting movements and in an earlier post I outlined the first 7 reasons. Here we look at reasons 8-14.

8. The quickest way to reach a city is through a church planting movement of self-reproducing churches.

Churches typically plant churches in isolation, although some churches or networks may be able to plant small organic networks within a city.  To reach a city requires a church-planting movement that can only be created by concerted collaboration between churches and networks over a period of time.

Reaching a city requires a self-sustaining movement of church-planting churches, something that has a life of its own. Movement dynamics are only generated and sustained when plants are happening in sufficient number which generates a tipping-point for planting.  To change the metaphor what is needed is a concerted effort to generate enough ‘heat’ to sustain a movement.  In most UK cities that won’t happen unless we reach outside of existing partnerships to work together. Momentum develops as a city network accelerates church-planting and creates a culture of planting across the churches that becomes infectious and as churches plant, share resources, ideas, recruit planters, train interns most quickly through a vibrant city-network.

9. We can work strategically to reach the whole city when we work in collaboration

Reaching new communities and thinking how to reach more challenging communities can best be done together.  In Birmingham the challenge of establishing  gospel-communities for every section of society and every people-group seems too big for us as busy churches and pastors – creative collaboration helps overcome inertia when it comes to the bigger challenges.

10. City networks invite and promote partnership with non-Church planting churches

Churches that would not identify themselves as church-planting churches have a role to play in a city network.

  • Adopting a church-plant: prayer, giving, sending, training leaders

It also helps partner churches consider whether they might be able to church plant themselves.

11. Working together in cities is a powerful witness to the gospel

Jesus prayed in John 17:20 ‘My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me.’

12. Working together develops a healthy gospel mind-set that trains your congregation to live with gospel priorities

Working with churches that differ from you on secondary issues requires three gospel qualities.

A generosity of spirit – working wherever we can with gospel churches

Invisibility’ – City movements do not ‘own’ the church-plants but instead bless and work alongside planters and their plants. That is something that happens quietly and behind the scenes. Members of the plant may not even be very aware of the support and help the planter is receiving. In Birmingham the ‘2020’ label does not appear

Kingdom mind-set – We must get the gospel out and rather than seeing other churches as unwelcome rivals we rejoice in the work the Lord is doing through planting across a city.

13. Working together is a massive encouragement to our congregations

Our experience in Birmingham has been that congregations thrive when churches work together. Many Christians long for greater unity across the churches and

14. Working at a city level allows for local, flexible expressions of partnership

City movement will need to look different from one city to the next. The model for such movements allow for a high degree of flexibility.

Apr 9, 2014
neil

Impacting our cities – a conference for everyone!

2020birmingham will be holding its annual conference on Tuesday 3rd June in Birmingham. At the heart of our commitment to mission is a belief that to reach our cities for Christ we need to see churches planted that in turn will plant churches.  We need nothing less than church-planting movements of all shapes and sizes. At our conference this year Richard Coekin of Co-Mission Network in London will share something of a vision to plant 360 congregations in London over 25 years.

But to reach the people of our cities it won’t be enough even to plant many more churches.  To impact our cities we will need churches established that can creatively engage with the gospel across culture, class, ethnicity and every sphere and interest of life. The focus of this year’s conference will be to ask what might it look like for church-planting movements to engage our communities and impact our cities for Christ

If you live in a UK city (or have a heart for our cities) and want to think through what it might look like for you to work towards a church-planting movement where you are then why not join us. If you want to consider what it might look like for your church to engage through social action, the arts, politics and more  then this could be a good place to meet with others who are also seeking to engage their communities in this way.

Here’s a short video introducing our conferences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have become all things to win all people so that by all possible means I might save some. I do this for the sake of the gospel, that I may share in its blessings. 1 Cor. 9:22-23 (NIV 2011).

Oct 23, 2013
neil

Our vision for 20 churches over 10 years in 6 minutes

We hope you like our new 2020birmingham video setting out our vision for 20 churches over 10 years told in 6 minutes.

 

Sep 10, 2013
neil

Momentum – working to plant churches that multiply

Saturday 19th October is the date of the next 2020birmingham conference. Why not join with church-planters and those with an interest in church planting for the day.

A mix of talks, workshops, worship and interviews with people in the process of planting, the day is designed to help us think through all things planting. The event is hosted by 8 church-planting churches located in Birmingham but all are welcome. Our workshop options are designed to offer something for everyone. So whether you’re just curious about planting, committed to leading a plant, already planting and looking for ideas or even developing a network of plants, this conference is ideal for you. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For details and booking click here

Any questions? Contact us on [email protected]

Jun 28, 2013
neil

Our story: City Church, the first 14 years

The Gospel Partnerships invited me to share some the ways in which God has been at work in and through City Church Birmingham since we began to meet in 1999. The Gospel Partnership site contains a growing set of resources on training, multiplying congregations and evangelism. Well worth returning to the site on a regular basis for input from a whole range of churches.

Jul 3, 2012
neil

‘We should be doing more for the Lord in this great city’ – How CH Spurgeon changed the face of London

What happens to churches that really understands the radical message of the gospel of God’s grace?  They make it an urgent priority to proclaim the message of the gospel to their communities & cities and at the same time they make it a necessary priority to love and serve their neighbours in deed as well as word.

I’ve written before on Tim Keller’s book Generous Justice and his summary of the biblical evidence that your attitude to the poor is a measure of your grasp of the gospel. Having read DeYoung & Gilbert’s book on exactly how evangelism and social concern relate to the mission of the Church and the mission of individual Christian I look forward to making some comments soon. Both books are important reminders that whilst the preaching of the gospel is central to our work, where the gospel is at work in our lives, Christians are concerned for the practical needs of the most needy in our cities.

In my reading this morning I was reminded of just how the greatest preacher and evangelist of the British church in the 19th century, CH Spurgeon, was also hugely committed to mercy ministry. Larry J. Michael summarises Spurgeon’s impact on London in his Spurgeon on Leadership writing;

Spurgeon blended evangelism and social concern perfectly. In fact, most philanthropic movements in the nineteenth century originated with evangelicals. Spurgeon saw society as an organic whole.

He built almshouses for the poor (only one was in existence when he came to London). He built seventeen houses for the aged and a school for four hundred children. He erected the Stockwell Orphanage for homeless children. He began the Colportage Ministry to provide books for poor rural pastors. He instituted the Pastor’s Aid Society to help the poor. He also founded the Old Ladies Homes, the Book Fund Ministry, the Rock Loan Tract Society, the Ladies Maternal Society, the Metropolitan Tabernacle Poor Minister’s Clothing Society, the Flower Mission, the Baptist Country Mission, Mrs. Thomas’s Mothers Mission, Mrs. Evan’s Home and Foreign Missionary Working Society, the Gospel Temperance Society, the Tract Society, the ragged schools, the Pioneer Mission, and other ministries.

They all fit his approach to bringing the whole gospel to affect the whole person in every area of life.

Fullerton’s biography of Spurgeon records the birth of Stockwell Orphanage (sometimes called the greatest sermon Spurgeon ever preached);

at one of the Monday evening prayer meetings, which in his day were phenomenal, he said, “We are a large church, and should be doing more for the Lord in this great city. I want us to ask Him to send us some new work; and if we need money to carry it on, let us pray that the means may also be sent.” So the Stockwell Orphanage was really born in a prayer meeting.

In our own times the State has taken on much of this work but the church continues to witness to the gospel in a multitude of ways not least through City Missions up and down the country as well as releasing many volunteers to work with organisations such as Christians against Poverty.

May we continue to find in the gospel reason to join Spurgeon in proclaiming ‘we should be doing more for the Lord in this great city‘.

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