Browsing articles in "Church Planting"
Jan 10, 2012
neil

Why the New York Times thinks Birmingham is better than Space!

Looking for a great holiday in 2012. According to the New York Times Birmingham is ranked 19 in their list of 45 places to go in 2012. In a list that didn’t mention Paris, Rome or Madrid Birmingham even came ahead of Space! The reason? ‘Could England’s second city be first in food?’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Thomas writing in the Independent said ‘six months ago I did something that few others can claim, or would even want to claim to have done. I took my wife, Clare, to celebrate our silver wedding anniversary with a night of romantic bliss… in Birmingham.’

‘It could be LA. It could by Sydney. It’s actually Birmingham. And The New York Times is quite right. It’s a great place. You should absolutely go there in 2012.’

But if you’re a Christian I have better reason than food for you to not just make a visit but to come and live in our great city. 2020birmingham is looking to work with people, churches and organisations seeking to plant churches in our city. Maybe God would say to you ‘It’s a great place. You should absolutely go there in 2012, 13,14….’


Nov 3, 2011
neil

Why we shouldn’t all be church planting

The latest IX marks e-jounal focuses on the why and how of church revitalization. At a time when church-planting is all the rage here is a reason to stop and think about the place and opportunity of renewing a church.

Including an interesting article by Mike McKinley on the relative merits of church-planting vs. church-revitalization. The article could have been even more interesting if he had discussed the third option of church-replant. What is replanting and how is it different from church-revitalization?

Oct 26, 2011
neil

Keller’s answer to every church’s question

The City to City Europe conference is getting off to a great start here in Berlin.

500 delegates from 26 countries representing over 100 nations all concerned to see churches planted across Europe has to be reason to rejoice and a reason for hope.

We’ve heard of God richly blessing planting initiatives and we’ve heard of God richly blessing faithful church-planters who’s work is hard because there is little fruit.

One planter of a church in Paris described ‘the privilege of ploughing where the ground is hard’, another in Frankfurt described the challenge of being a bi-vocational Pastor with a weekly congregation of 15 of so. Both stories are reminders of why we need to pray for our countries in Europe.

Tim Keller gave the first keynote address on the gospel-centred church and here’s one gem of an answer to  a thoughtful question that came out of his talk.

How can we know whether our church is either too accommodating to the culture of our city or not accommodating enough?

Keller’s answer: A church that is not accommodating, culturally, will be seeing no conversions because no-one will ever come through the door. A church that is too accommodating, culturally, will be seeing lots of new people attending but no changed lives because the church is only mirroring the culture rather than critiquing the culture.

So a gospel church in a city should be willing and able to flex on the negotiables making it’s meetings accessible to non-believers but not flexing  on gospel-living as the church challenges the culture by being an attractive and distinctive gospel-community.

Deciding when and how to celebrate the culture of a city and when and how to critique the culture of a city is the art of being a church-planter.

Oct 25, 2011
neil

500 reasons to spare a thought for Berlin today

I’m with 4 others from 2020birmingham and in total 500 church-planters, network leaders and city catalysts from around Europe meeting in Berlin for the next 3 days.  Our goal;  to consider just how we reach the great cities of Europe with the gospel and how through such a network as this we can work together to see it happen.

Here’s Tim Keller on speaking at CitytoCity Europe

For more details about the conference visit citytocity: europe

Sep 8, 2011
neil

What made Spurgeon a church-planter?

In the book Spurgeon on Leadership Larry J. Michael introduces us to the man and his ministry that made him, arguably, the greatest evangelical of the 19th century.

The book has chapters on a variety of leadership essentials including calling, character, creativity and casting vision amongst others. Each one is  packed full of inspiring examples, quotations and principles from his life and ministry.

As I work alongside other church leaders in church-planting in Birmingham here are a few that have inspired and encouraged me to in the words of William Carey ‘Expect Great Things from God, Attempt Great Things for God.’

It’s Spurgeon’s confidence in God and the gospel that prepared him to make bold, ambitious plans for the expansion of the gospel:

The common policy of our churches is that of great prudence. We do not, as a rule, attempt anything beyond our strength…We accomplish little because we have no idea of doing much. I would to God we had more ‘pluck.’

I make it bold to assert that, in the service of God, nothing is impossible, and nothing is improbable. Go in great things, brethren, in the Name of God; risk everything on His promise, and according to your faith shall it be done unto you.

It was that same confidence that gave him a great vision for church-planting

We must build this Tabernacle strongly, I am sure, for our friends are always with us. . . But our desire is, after we have fitted our vestry, schools, and other rooms, that we shall be able to build other chapels….I will not rest until the dark county of Surrey is covered with places of worship. I took on this Tabernacle as only the beginning; within the last six months, we have started two churches, one in Wandsworth and the other in Greenwich, and the Lord has prospered them, the pool of baptism has often been stirred with converts. And what we have done in two places, I am about to do in a third, and we will do it, not for the third or fourth, but for the hundredth time, God being our Helper. I am sure I may make my strongest appeal to my brethren, because we do not mean to build this Tabernacle as our nest, and then be idle. We must go from strength to strength , and be a missionary church, and never rest until, not only this neighbourhood, but our country, of which it is said that some parts are as dark as India, shall have been enlightened with the gospel.

Buy the book and learn to lead!

 

Jul 31, 2011
neil

100 ways to engage your neighbourhood

Tim Keller has written

There are only two kinds of churches;

One kind says to its community: ‘You can come to us, learn our language, learn our interests, become like us and meet our needs.

The other kind says to its community: ‘We will come to you, learn your language, learn your interests, join in your life and try to meet your needs.’

It is pretty obvious which approach will do most to gain the gospel a hearing as we take Christ to the world.

Josh Reeves is planting a church in Round Rock, Texas. There’s nothing like planting a church to stretch your thinking as to how you and the church family can make the most of opportunities to develop community relationships.

Recently I made a list of 100 ways to engage your neighborhood. I have found that it is often helpful to have practical ideas to start engaging the people around me in order to be a better neighbor. Most of the things on this list are normal, everyday things that many people are already doing. The hope is that we would do these things with Gospel intentionality. This means we do them:

  • In the normal rhythms of life pursuing to meet and engage new people
  • Prayerfully watching and listening to the Holy Spirit to discern where God is working.
  • Looking to boldly, humbly, and contextually proclaiming the Gospel in word and deed.

For a look at Josh’s top 100 ideas visit here

May 19, 2011
neil

Mark Driscoll in conversation on city-wide church planting partnerships

May 14, 2011
neil

Driscoll, Timmis, Powell/Bell – church planting audio now on line

Last Thursday and Friday 400 people gathered in Birmingham, UK, for a  church planting bootcamp for all seasons hosted by Acts29 Western Europe and 2020birmingham.

Speakers included Mark Driscoll, Steve Timmis, Neil Powell and Jonathan Bell.

The audio is now available to download and enjoy.

May 9, 2011
neil

8 lessons in church planting from the forallseasons conference

On Thursday and Friday of last week ‘for all seasons’ church planting conference took place in Birmingham co-hosted by Acts29 Western Europe and 2020birmingham. Audio and video from the conference will be available soon. But here are eight take homes for me from the two days.

1. God is doing amazing things in our nation(s). To have 400 people all seriously thinking about church planting (and a further 220 at a London based conference on planting the day before) highlights a transformation in the church scene in the UK and Western Europe.

2. The atmosphere at the conference was just fantastic.  A real unity was evident and the whole time was remarkably free of tribalism and suspicions of others. There was just a huge desire, borne out of a spirit-filled generosity, to bless others. The attitude was one of ‘how can I help you? How can I bless you?’ By passing on freely anything and everything we really wanted to help others be better planters!  At a dinner with Mark Driscoll on the Thursday evening we had representatives of New Frontiers, FIEC, the Anglican Diocese and Elim Pentecostal all sitting down together thinking how we might work together to get the gospel to the city of Birmingham!

3. Our failure to attempt great things for God is often borne out of fear of men. That means we need to recognise that ‘it is a sin to take too much of a risk in planting but it is as much of a sin not to take a risk out of fear.’ Mark Driscoll

4. On a similar theme it’s not enough for a small church to think we can’t do anything when it comes to church planting. True a small church may not be able to plant itself but it can contribute to a bigger vision (prayer, finances, wisdom and knowledge of a community or city).

A church planting conference should not just be full of church planters any more than a missions conference should be full of people about to head off overseas. As Rick Warren has said elsewhere ‘it is not a sin to be a small church but it is a sin to be a small church with a small vision’.

5. It really does matter what motivates us in church planting. To have a healthy church plant we need a healthy church planter and the gospel at the heart of our motivates is essential.

Steve Timmis challenged us with the question ‘Are we looking to church planting for our justification? Looking to church planting for our place in the world?’ And when that is a danger the antidote to that is remembering ‘church planter, our identity is ‘in Christ’’. And that has huge implications because succeed or fail (humanly speaking) I am secure in who I am.  ‘My church plant can break up into a 100 different pieces but nothing can change the fact that I am ‘in Christ’ Steve Timmis.

6. ‘Every year you plant your church again’. Mark Driscoll reminded us that the way to grow your church plant and be effective in leadership is never to stop being a church planter but to look to the same mindset to keep growing.

7. The 2020birmingham initiative reminded us all that it takes a big vision to impact a big city. If our vision is to plant a church, even a large church, it has to give way to God’s vision which is nothing less than his global fame. If our vision is to reach our cities for Christ rather than plant a church that requires a paradigm shift in our thinking. In the past 10 to 15 years we have undergone one important shift from accidental planting to intentional planting. Now we need the second shift from intentional planting to intentional partnerships in church planting. Working together to fulfil a vision that no one church is equipped to make on its own.

8. Finally, church planting must, if it is to be true to the gospel, never be about empire building. ‘How do I live out my identity? By being a lover of God and a lover of others. Whoever it is about it is never about me.’ Steve Timmis

Apr 28, 2011
neil

14 insights on integrity from Darrin Patrick

Darrin Patrick is pastor of The Journey in Saint Lous and Vice President of Acts29 network. He spoke yesterday at Exponential conference on Integrity as a church planter. He preached on Galatians 5 and here are 14 key insights.

1. You can fight for change but you can’t fight it alone.

2. ‘fruit of the Spirit’ is singular. It grows together. That means you’re not supposed to look for the ones you’ve got but the ones you haven’t.

3. Change produced by the Spirit is inside out change. Behaviour modification is stuck on the outside.

4. How do you know whether your change is behaviour modification or the fruit of the Spirit. Ask ‘who really thinks I’ve changed? Those who are closest to me or those furthest away?’ Those closest to you will know whether it is inside out

5. Do you worry more about your own sin more than others?

6. Ask your spouse, ask your children what your weakest trait is?

7. Fruit grows communally and in community

8. You find your idols in your daydreams and your nightmares

9. A lot of you are planting churches because you’ve never been in a good church. That’s not a great place to be starting from.

10. Read the Bible. Please. Will you at least have it in your lap when you attend a conference.

11. Condemnation is from Satan. It pushes you away from God. Conviction is from the Spirit and says come to me.

12. ‘For every one look you take at your sin take ten looks at him.’ Robert Murray McCheyne

13. Much talk and books on integrity are a bunch of man-made rules

14. Most young ministers seek one mentor/accountability pastor. You need an army of people.

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