May 22, 2013
neil

Planting into a City Suburb

I’m speaking at a workshop today at the Planting for Christ conference. My theme: Planting in a City Suburb. Here are my notes . . . part 1.

A. Cities and suburbs

1. What do we mean by a suburb?

Wikipedia defines it this way (highlighting how the term means something a little different in the US from the UK). A suburb is a residential area, either existing as part of a city or urban area (as in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom), or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city (as in the United States and Canada).

English Heritage goes for the following: In general terms, suburbs can perhaps be best described as outgrowths or dependencies of larger settlements – somewhere with a clear relationship with a city or town but with its own distinct character.

Maybe we can best say: a city suburb is a distinct, recognisable area within a city, often with an integrity and character that is valued by the local community.

2. What is the relationship between the city and the suburb?

For cities like Birmingham (perhaps to be contrasted with global cities) a typical pattern would be

Urban-core, inner city, inner suburbs, outer suburbs, rural

B. What does it mean to plant in a city-suburb?

Rather than appealing to a sector of society you are taking responsibility for a part of the mission field geographically – John James, Helier Chapel.

You might identify the community by a post-code, a housing estate, political ward, but usually by a named area.

1. Contextualisation is essential

  • Contextualisation is inevitable
  • Contextualisation is biblical
  • Contextualisation is necessary
  • Contextualisation is complicated

2. When planting in the suburbs, community is key to contextualisation

a. Learn the cultureRon Edmunson comments:  Every city, every village, and every group of people have their own unique identity. What matters most? What do they celebrate? Where do people live and play? What do they do for fun? What’s their language? What are the traditions unique to this area? What history do they value?
b. Learn the marketChip Weeler asks: Are schools an option for a building? Is the community in a growth mode or a declining mode? What are the major problems, concerns, and needs of the community? Who are the leading employers? What are the demographics?
c. Commit to the community. Planting in suburbs takes time and a great deal of patience.

3. Top Ways to Connect to Your Community

a. Be specific and strategic with your contacts

Very often this means starting with the families; mums and toddlers, kids & youth, messy church.
We’re five years in and we’ve seen very little fruit. We are still right at the start. But there is a whole community of people whose kids have been with us and we’re having conversations we wouldn’t have had three years agoAndy Weatherley, Grace Church.

b. Build missional communities as a key strategy to reach the community

In City-suburb planting the church needs to engage the community.
Telling members of the plant simply to ‘go and be missional’ in an impenetrable community simply won’t work.
Missional small groups are a surer way in to the community and a training ground for plant members. The leader’s job is to create a context for mission within a community setting. For these groups to work at least the hosts and leaders need to live in or very near the community being reached.

  • Small group bible-studies are open to the local community (ie a mixed group of Christians and non-Christians). All the questions are aimed at our belief system – Andy Weatherley. The danger is that you de-skill the Christians in their Bible-handling skills.
  • Small groups are intentionally outward focused and look to draw in members of the community through a variety of social gatherings e.g. Eating food, celebrating national events such as Jubilee, Football World Cup, Christmas, Oscars Film night, . . . whatever your community is in to.
  • Small groups are often the first point of contact with non-Christians.

Small group leaders need to be evangelists as well as Bible-study group leaders. A church-planter adopting this model needs to give a disproportionate amount of time and attention to training up leaders
Community group leaders are the key to the success of our churchAndy Weatherley, Grace Church.

c. Be a servant

Affluent suburbs

Poorer suburbs

d. Use media to connect with your community

Chip Weeler suggests: Invest as much as you can in a Web site—a good Web site. Have the Web site up and running before the launch of the church, and use it as a tool for outreach. Post sermons, worship services, and areas of involvement. Make sure that the Web site clearly spells out where you meet, when you meet, how to dress, what to expect, and how the kids will be taken care of . . .take advantage of online communities such as MySpace and Facebook, as well as YouTube and other popular, free online sources.

Use photos from the community, landmarks from community, community events, etc. on your page. Give the casual viewer of your site links to the community they can identify with.

Produce a local newsletter; highlighting what’s going on in the community, featuring church-run or hosted events but not exclusively.

Follow Twitter feeds relevant to your community.

e. Join with community events (to use the language of Brad House ‘read the rhythms of your community’)

Have a presence at community events but be careful how you use it.
Case Study: Grace Church: Co-Co Mad (arty, drama, crafty festival)

f. Find the places to be

Where are the places people like to be in your suburb? Build in visits into your ministry as a planter and team.
Schools, Library, Gym, shops,

g. Run your own church events & activities

• Curry club
• B-B-Q and family games day
• Clothes exchange party
• Gospel choir
• Football team

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