Mar 11, 2011
neil

God does not play Pictionary

A few years ago two scientific experiments were launched.  The first is aimed at discovering how and when life began the other is concerned with discovering how and when life ends.

The Hadron Collider costs billions and has been built to recreate the first few fractions of a second after the big bang and the universe began.  The second has a much more limited budget but I think could yield more extraordinary results it’s called the AWARE study and it explores what happens after life ends.  What happens to us after we die?

How then does it work? The idea is to speak to those who have had near death experiences and test their claims.  Studies show that somewhere between 10 and 20% of those who reach the point of death through a cardiac arrest but are then revived back to life actually have memories beyond their moment of death.

In particular the study will investigate the claims of people who during cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts have described how they actually were mentally conscious and in fact actually witnessed their own resuscitation attempts as they floated in an out of body experience from a vantage point outside of their own bodies, as if they were looking down on themselves from a bird’s eye view.

People describe sometimes in great detail, everything that was happening around them whilst they were technically dead.  They could describe things they should not have been able to know and couldn’t really have made up.  They might be able to say which doctor was attempting to resuscitate them male, female, young, old, black or white, or recall a unique detail such as how a doctor tripped over the edge of the bed and knocked something to the ground.  The sort of details that require an explanation and seemingly defy rational scientific answers.

So in the AWARE study scientists will place pictures on the ceilings in Hospital A&E bays that are only visible by looking down from the ceiling and no other way.  Patients of course won’t know any of this and the images will be regularly changed.

Those patients successfully revived will then be interviewed and asked to describe what they saw.  If any of them are able to describe the images accurately then scientists will have to tear up the rule books. The shame is that it will be another two years before studies are completed.

What do these two different studies tell us about ourselves?

I guess quite simply that as human beings we are curious about much more than our day to day lives.  We are keen to discover and investigate.  At one level we want a cure for cancer, we want cheaper petrol, we want our team to win the league but we have bigger questions about our origins and our destiny; who we are? Where we come from? Where we are going?

Inevitably in the midst of such philosophical discussions sooner or later God is drawn in to the conversations.  Is he real, can we know anything about him, does scientific discovery make his existence more or less likely?

I like reading stories of people’s lives and recently I have been reading a book by Anthony Flew – you may not have heard of him he was a British Philosopher who died last year and early in his career he wrote a paper entitled ‘Theology and falsification’.  It might sound a bit technical (perhaps even a bit dull) but it is actually ‘the most frequently-quoted philosophical publication of the second half of the 20th century’.

It was a paper that debunked God.  You could say he was ‘doing a Dawkins’. Flew wrote a sophisticated ‘God delusion’ and it remains a contemporary classic.  But just seven years ago he announced that he as wrong and has publically retracted his atheism and declared himself a believer in God.

This is what he writes in his book:  There is a God – how the world’s most notorious atheist changed his mind.

I now believe that the universe was brought into existence by an infinite Intelligence….why do I believe this, given that I expounded and defended atheism for more than a half century? The short answer is this: this is the world picture, as I see it, that has emerged from modern science.

Flew died last year a believer in God and it was looking to modern science that he found overwhelming reason to believe in a god. As a philosopher it was simply no longer credible to believe that this universe of law and order, of complexity and apparent design could have originated from nothing.

And to his fellow sceptics Flew puts the following question:

What should have to occur or to have occurred to constitute for us a reason to at least consider the existence of a superior Mind?

It is a good question and it is essentially our question this evening if evidence of God would you need to at least consider the existence of God.

Albert Einstein contrary to popular opinion was not an atheist and in fact he expressly denied that fact on more than one occasion.

But he did believe that as human beings science could only ever give us a very limited understanding of God. This is how he illustrated the point:

We [human beings] are in a position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn’t know what it is.  That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being towards God.

Einstein is far from the dogmatic atheist that people like Richard Dawkins claim him to be…but he is what you might call a dogmatic agnostic….what that means is that Einstein says we don’t know much about God and we can’t.  Agnosticism is actually simply another word for ignorance. The one thing that we know is that we don’t know.

We might suspect a creator, yet we don’t know and we can’t know who he is.

The stats for our country reveal that too.  60 % of the UK population believe in a personal god but most of us would not be willing to put a name to that god.

I think that’s true of most of my friends – they believe in some kind of God but they also are fairly sure that they have no good reason to believe in anything more than a distant deity.

Here’s the point – reason alone can only get you so far -perhaps the vague notion of a god.

And here then is the conclusion that many of us reach;  if God is there,  a God who wants to know us, why doesn’t he make himself more  obvious?

Well the Christian claim is that he has made it more obvious than by what we can work out through reason. We are not limited to reason but God has given us revelation.

And the staggering claim of Christianity is that God has spoken to us not in visions or dreams not in messages in the stars but in human form, personally, in his son Jesus and what a difference that makes.

A lot of people if they believe in God at all think he communicates in some deliberately vague way almost designed to confuse us. We think the way God communicates is a bit like the way we play Pictionary. Take away words and see just how difficult and confusing communication is!

Well it might be funny on Christmas day to live without words but it’s not so funny communicating through Pictionary in an operating theatre.

The great claim of the Christian faith is that God has spoken to us face to face and mouth to mouth through his Son. Jesus said to his disciples; anyone who has seen me has seen the Father. The apostle John wrote in John 1:18,  ‘No-one has ever seen God, but God the One and Only, who is at the Father’s side, has made him known.’

Jesus perfectly reveals God. To have seen Jesus is to have seen God!

We don’t need Hadron colliders or even near-death experiences to know if anyone is out there.  God has not left us in the dark and God does not play Pictionary. We are no longer looking up and guessing because, in Christ, God has broken into our world.

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